Wishing You a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Christmas is upon us once again, and it is a sweet time for our household. We, of course, hope it is for yours as well. As Christians, we are reminded of the gift of salvation as we celebrate the birth of our Lord and Savior. When New Year's Day is added to this festive season, it's hard not to reflect on all the ways God has been gracious and merciful to us in the past year.
Posted by Ian Robertson on 12/25/2016 to News

What Saith the Lord about Civil Magistrates?

What Saith the Lord about Civil Magistrates?
We are nearing Election Day, and the partisan rancor is about to reach its predictable ululating crescendo. The sour aroma of fear, pragmatism, and unthinking party tribalism is wafting in the breeze. So, what are Christians to do when elections creep into view? Is voting for the lesser of two evils ever righteous?
Posted by Ian Robertson on 11/3/2016 to What Saith the Lord?

Welcome to our new site!

Welcome to Attentive Sons Printing Co.'s new website! We are thrilled by this change, and we think you will be too.
Posted by Ian Robertson on 10/6/2016 to News

Drunken Oglers, Insolent Wives, and Persian Honor

Drunken Oglers, Insolent Wives, and Persian Honor
Not every hoary-headed old man has a crown of glory; some have failed to live righteously and, therefore, are left to settle for the dunce cap of folly instead. As I see it, King Ahasuerus has just such a dunce cap when we behold the anger in his heart (Eccl. 7:9), his constant drunkenness, and his immodest, degrading treatment of his wife.
Posted by Ian Robertson on 6/14/2016

Your Mind Might Be a Potemkin Village

Your Mind Might Be a Potemkin Village

Just the other day, I encountered this comparatively unadorned slice of Spurgeon insight and was struck by its implications: “I can see myself, but not as well as either my friends or foes. Men can see me better than I can see myself; but man can not see me as God sees me.”

Is our understanding of our own character and thoughts always more accurate than the understanding others may glean from conversations with us and our behavior? Do we always know ourselves better than those around as, as we so often claim?

Posted by Ian Robertson on 6/11/2016